Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) Courses

OUHSC; Development and Behavioral Pediatrics; Center on Child Abuse & Neglect


Date Submitted: 09/08/2021


Contact Information:

La’ Chanda K. Stephens-Totimeh – Research Project Coordinator & PAC Facilitator

405-317-4021

Lachanda-totimeh@ouhsc.edu

OUHSC; Development and Behavioral Pediatrics; Center on Child Abuse & Neglect

1000 NE 13th St. FI Nicholson Twr 4200 Oklahoma City, OK 73104


Rating Category: Promising Practice

Focus Area: Social Emotional Learning


Focus Population: Children, Caregivers, Guardians, Parents


Goals and Outcomes:

The primary goals of this submission are to (1) promote a state-wide training program in developing and maintaining effective Parent Advisory Committees and (2) to secure funding to support this training program. The intended outcomes are to launch Parent Advisory Committees (PACs) for child and family serving organizations and programs across the state of Oklahoma and provide continued training and support for these PACs to ensure their effectiveness and sustainable implementation over time.


More specifically, building off our established history of successfully developing and maintaining an effective Parent Advisory Committee, the Oklahoma Health Sciences Center’s SafeCare© Parent Partnership Advisory Committee (SC PPAC) plans to facilitate a training for outside agencies to develop and maintain their Parent Advisory Committees (PACs). We plan to offer several options for this training including a comprehensive course on the development of PACs, which is designed for professionals without experience designing or maintaining a PAC or parenting board. This course consists of 2 all-day trainings (8 hours each) and 10 monthly 1.5-hour calls on select topics (e.g., diversity and inclusion, implementation, progress reports from trainees). Agencies across the state are eligible to participate as trainings will be held virtually.


Brief Summary:

Research studies, such as the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study, support the premise that early adversity impairs children’s development and health. Further, inequities at the individual, family, and systems level must be addressed to truly enhance the well-being of children. Other research has indicated there is a continuum of services, including home-based parenting programs (also called “home-visiting), that positively impact caregivers’ ability to provide nurturing, stable relationships. These services have been found to enhance protective factors, mitigate the impact of early adversity, and potentially prevent the occurrence of ACEs. Importantly, to improve the continuum of services addressing and preventing ACEs, parent outreach is needed to help bolster family protective factors and community voice is needed to inform policy and funding decisions. Community voice is essential for combating inequities through providing more congruent, relevant services. Further, an understanding of the barriers of high-risk families in accessing needed services is needed when making policy and funding decisions. Over the past ten years, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center’s SafeCare© Parent Partnership Advisory Committee has provided parent voice to educate and support legislators and key stakeholders in making policy and funding decisions based on key areas including: a) parenting and support programs to support high-risk families (home-based parenting, community mental health, etc.), b) high quality physical and mental health care and emotion socialization for children and their caregivers, c) affordable and safe housing for high-risk children and families, d) high quality early childhood education programs, e) high-quality, nutritious food, and f) employment and educational opportunities for caregivers.

Our proposal is targeted to all family-serving agencies in Oklahoma that wish to start up their own parent partnership advisory committee. We propose to train these agencies on the creation and sustainable implementation of parent partnership advisory committees and will provide year-long technical assistance to all participating agencies.


Rated by another Clearinghouse: No


Practice-based Idea in Early Childhood:

Parent advisory committees (PAC) have been successfully implemented across a wide range of early childhood settings. For example, parent advisory committees are used in public school systems, daycare settings, hospitals, and child development centers. Within our own PAC at the OUHSC Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, parents report high levels of satisfaction and remain active in the PAC for several years. In a recent monthly meeting, multiple parents on our PAC reported that their participation had changed their lives and the lives of their children. They reported feeling more informed, supported, and heard than before they became involved in the PAC. Recently, our PAC members informed service agencies about needs and priority resources for vulnerable families during the COVID-19 crisis. PAC members educated and utilized their social media platforms to share resources, positive parenting information, and encourage participating in civil duties (e.g., social distancing). PAC amplified their influence by sharing information on issues, such as parenting, childcare, health (including brain health), education, and family well-being. This was accomplished through reviewing materials requested by agencies, meeting with key personnel, participating in planning meetings, and community outreach. These efforts have enhanced awareness regarding food and childcare deserts, education, voting, and health disparities with those in their communities. We have impacted the early childhood care experiences of children in Oklahoma by piloting the trauma-informed childcare training program. The training was provided to six childcare providers; 15 Oklahoma State University human development, family sciences, and psychology undergraduate students; and seven volunteers. This training supports the development of child resilience-building skills and knowledge. Moreover, empirical studies demonstrate the impact of parent advisory committees in altering the culture of an organization by providing parent perspectives and insights (Latunde, 2018; Popper, Anderson, Black, Ericson, & Peck, 1987; Romanczuk, 2006; Wilinski & Vellanki, 2020). Beyond the impact of PACs, evidence suggests quality training is crucial to develop and sustain an effective PAC. At the national level, the National Family Support Network provides a 1-day training to program staff interested in launching a PAC or refining their PAC process. Participants of this training report high levels of satisfaction. Quotes from participants include “Everything was extremely organized and explained in a wonderful manner. I am prepared to start the steps of having a PAC at my organization”, “This was an engaging training that helped me to better visualize highly functioning and effective Parent Advisory Committees (PACs) in my agency. I feel much more equipped now to begin to work to develop the PACs in a much more intentional and purposeful manner”, and “I liked the specific examples, concrete ideas, and understanding the reasons why they were implemented to contribute to the success of the Family Resource Center and Parent Advisory Committee”. Importantly, our PAC training team has completed this national training and plans to require it as a prerequisite for our own PAC course. Specially, while the national training is highly informative and educational, it is limited to one day of training. Our own experience suggests that this is not sufficient to fully prepare for developing and sustaining a PAC, which is why our training includes monthly meetings to check in with agencies and problem-solve any challenges or barriers to success. Additionally, the national training does not account for regional differences and Oklahoma has a unique culture with its own needs that should be considered when implementing a PAC. For example, Oklahoma has the highest rate of adverse childhood experiences in the country. Within Oklahoma, 30% of children experience parental divorce, 17% witness parental abuse of substances, 11% witness domestic violence, 10% have an incarcerated parent, 13% witness or are a victim of neighborhood violence, and 13% have experienced at least three adversities in their life. Given the high rates of adversity experienced by the families in early childhood settings in Oklahoma, PACs must take a trauma-informed approach. As part of our PAC training, we include training in trauma-informed approaches and also train programs on how to offer trauma-informed childcare for the children of parents participating in the PAC. The core principals of a traumainformed approach to care are (1) empowerment, (2) choice, (3) safety, and (4) trustworthiness. Our training ensures that the PAC adheres to these principals.


Practice in Early Childhood Settings: N/A


Promotes Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging:

There are significant inequities for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) in terms of housing, education, and job options, which impact the well-being and development of the children and families. We intend to directly address inequities by supporting family voice on factors impacting raising young children in Oklahoma. Further, we will integrate lessons learned through our participation in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Anti-Racism Summit training. We were accepted through competitive application for this training. Moreover, through the PAC at OUHSC, our Parent Leaders have experienced continuing education, advocacy for family voice at local, state and national levels, and increased engagement in their families, communities, schools, employment and policy decision-makers. These activities helped parent leaders launch professional careers (e.g., registered nurse, master’s degrees, and vocational education), improved credit, homeownership in neighborhoods with less crime and higher-rated schools, healthier relationships, increased paternal parenting skills, and increased participation within their children’s schools. Furthermore, our PAC staff, students and volunteers have experienced continuing education, advocacy for family voice, increased engagement with schools, employment and policy decisionmakers. Moreover, helped career advancement (e.g. masters and Ph.D. degrees and certifications). Overall, our PAC and the training we would provide to develop additional PACs promote equity, diversity, inclusion, and belonging within the high-risk, vulnerable population of Oklahoma parents, youth, students and professionals. Our PAC families, staff, students and volunteers’ diversities (e.g. culture, race, ethnicity, abilities, disabilities, spiritual beliefs, gender, sexual identities, age, and immigration status) are one of our greatest characteristics.


Implementation:

The OUHSC SafeCare© Parent Partnership Advisory Committee (SC PPAC) has been operating continuously for over 10 years. The SC PPAC and OUHSC Team will co-facilitate training for outside agencies to develop and maintain an effective Parent Advisory Committee (PAC). We plan to offer two intensive courses. The Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) Comprehensive Course 101 will be 12 months long and cost $350 per agency (this cost is estimated based on 15+ agencies participating in the course). This course provides comprehensive training on the development of PACs and is designed for professionals without experience designing or maintaining a PAC or parenting board. This course was designed utilizing The Principles of Family Support Practices and National Family Support Network Strengthening Families Framework by promoting family centeredness and strengthening, diversity, equity, inclusion, and community strengthening and evaluation. Attendees will receive training and consulting as they develop their PAC while working through the 7 Stages for Developing and Sustaining Effective Parent Advisory Committees Checklist. This course consists of 2 all-day pieces of training (8 hours each) and 10 monthly 1.5-hour calls on select topics (e.g., diversity and inclusion, implementation, progress reports from trainees). Each agency is permitted to send up to three representatives to the training. The second course is the Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) Short Course 102, which spans 6 months and costs $175 per agency. The short course provides a more condensed overview of PAC development and is designed for professionals with experience designing and maintaining safer environments for parent or community groups. This course was designed utilizing The Principles of Family Support Practices and National Family Support Network Strengthening Families Framework by promoting family centeredness and strengthening, diversity, equity, inclusion, and community strengthening and evaluation. This course consists of 1 all-day training (8 hours) and 5 monthly 1.5-hour calls on select topics (e.g., diversity and inclusion, implementation, progress report from trainees). Each agency is permitted to send up to three representatives to the training. Supplemental training or consulting is available by request. Topics for supplemental training include a PAC Traumainformed Childcare Course, a Father Figure Advisory Committee (FFAC) Course, and a Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) Course.


Evaluation plan/recommendation:

A Training Evaluation will be administered for each of the training. We do not have a current evaluation plan, however, faculty and staff at the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect have conducted external evaluations of child and family programs (e.g., home visiting services) for several decades. If Clearinghouse recommends an evaluation, we could utilize the expertise of CCAN to conduct the evaluation.


Supports Available:

The Center on Child Abuse and Neglect is part of the Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The Center on Child Abuse and Neglect addresses the needs of Oklahoma’s most vulnerable children and their families through services, research, and training of other professionals in Oklahoma and nationwide. Further, the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect provides evidence-based clinical services to children and families affected by trauma or maltreatment, children experiencing a range of traumatic events, children and adolescents with problematic sexual behavior, physically abusive parents and their children, and abused and neglected children. For the proposed project, the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect has been working collaboratively with state agencies (Department of Health, Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse), early childhood support agencies (Oklahoma Partnership for School Readiness, Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy), nonprofit organizations (NorthCare Center, Latino Community Development Center, Parent Child Center of Tulsa), and tribes (Choctaw Nation, Cherokee Nation) towards the goal of developing and sustaining a continuum of effective home visitation programs designed specifically for parents with young children. The Center on Child Abuse and Neglect supports non-profit agencies in their workforce development, trains the homebased service providers, evaluates the SafeCare curriculum (currently testing an adapted and augmented model to improve outcomes with Oklahoma families) and examines the breadth of home-based parenting programs in Oklahoma. Additionally, the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, in partnership with Oklahoma State University, helps Legacy for Children™ (Legacy) be culturally and linguistically adapted for Spanish-monolingual Latino mothers. The Legacy program focus is on the mother-child relationship and the mother’s relationship to her community. The Legacy program trains clinicians to collaborate with mothers who eventually facilitate parent groups, support child social-emotional development, and decrease the mother’s social isolation. Parent engagement was crucial in the original and culturally adapted evidence based parenting program, Legacy for Children™. Given the history and scope of work conducted by CCAN, we have the expertise in child development, trauma and adversity, parenting, and therapy to conduct the proposed PAC training to other early childhood agencies throughout the state.


Standards/guidelines, Models, Outcomes, Programs:

Our PAC training was informed by several models and guidelines. First, as mentioned, our team participated in the National Family Support Network (NFSN) training on developing and sustaining a PAC. The NFSN framework utilizes the 7 Stages for Developing and Sustaining Effective Parent Advisory Committees Checklist.

The 7 Stages are:

  1. Planning and preparing staff and PAC advisors

  2. Recruiting and selecting PAC members

  3. Orienting and encouraging staff and parent partnership

  4. Develop PAC leadership guidelines, conduct election and train PAC officers

  5. Facilitate PAC meetings – schedule meetings, co-creator annual agenda items

  6. PAC members evaluate and adjust as needed

  7. Sustain PAC through ongoing recruitment and training, cultivating relationships.

Additionally, our PAC training utilizes a trauma-informed approach and provides training in providing trauma-informed childcare. This specialized training will expose child care providers supporting the PACs with the knowledge and skills to recognize signs of trauma and create a learning environment to support resiliency in families and society. This course provides providers with opportunities to develop trauma informed skills while managing a child care setting. This course is designed to benefit individuals in their personal and professional lives; in addition, to learn to serve youth at risk of experiencing Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Upon completion of this training, a participant should be able to: explore the adverse childhood experiences (ACE) research literature and theory, review the relevant research regarding challenging areas of parenting, review the relevant research regarding challenging areas of serving families with ACEs, apply information learned in real life situations/scenarios, and examine the connection between ACEs research and theory with exploring classroom and group setting and serving children and caregivers with possible trauma exposure.



Training Material and Manuals:

All of our training materials were created in-house by the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect’s research team. We have attached relevant information to this submission.


Implementation Costs:

Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) Comprehensive Course 101 Length of Training: 12 months this course provides a comprehensive training on the development of PACs and is designed for professionals without experience designing or maintaining a PAC or parenting board. This course was designed utilizing The Principles of Family Support Practices and National Family Support Network Strengthening Families Framework by promoting family centeredness and strengthening, diversity, equity, inclusion, and community strengthening and evaluation. Attendees will receive training and consulting as they develop their PAC while working through the 7 Stages for Developing and Sustaining Effective Parent Advisory Committees Checklist. This course consists of 2 all-day trainings (8 hours each) and 10 monthly 1.5-hour calls on select topics (e.g., diversity and inclusion, implementation, progress reports from trainees).


$350 per agency (15+ agencies)

$500 per agency (10-14 agencies)

$1,000 per agency (5-9 agencies)

$2,500 per agency (2-4 agencies)

$5,000 –1 agency full course


À la carte

$1,500 per 1-day training

$200 per monthly call

Parent Advisory Committee (PAC) Short Course 102

Length of Training: 6 months


This course provides a more condensed overview of PAC development and is designed for professionals with experience designing and maintaining safer environments for parent or community groups. This course was designed utilizing The Principles of Family Support Practices and National Family Support Network Strengthening Families Framework by promoting family centeredness and strengthening, diversity, equity, inclusion, and community strengthening and evaluation. This course provides 18 months of consulting, TA and training on the 7 Stages for Developing and Sustaining Effective Parent Advisory Committees Checklist. This course consists of 1 all-day training (8 hours) and 5 monthly 1.5-hour calls on select topics (e.g., diversity and inclusion, implementation, progress report from trainees).


$175 per agency (15+ agencies)

$275 per agency (10-14 agencies)

$550 per agency (5-9 agencies)

$1,350 per agency (2-4 agencies)

$2,700 –1 agency full course


À la carte

$750 per 1 half-day training

$200 per monthly call

Supplemental Trainings or Consulting Available by Request

PAC Trauma-informed Childcare Course 103

Length: 15.5 Hours in 6 months

Cost: $2,700

Father Figure Advisory Committee (FFAC) Course 104:

Length: 2 Hours Didactic & 2 hours of technical assistance

Cost: $700

Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) Course 105

Length: 6 hours

Cost: $1,000